Professor Roger Dooley : October 24

Doctors behaving badly: An insiders view of ethical breaches

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA[fontawesome icon=”asterisk” circle=”yes” size=”small” iconcolor=”” circlecolor=”#533B5F” circlebordercolor=”transparent”]Long time member of the QLD Psychology board ethics review panel

 

[fontawesome icon=”asterisk” circle=”yes” size=”small” iconcolor=”” circlecolor=”#533B5F” circlebordercolor=”transparent”]Member of the Mental Health Tribunal

 

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Senior clinical supervisor, University of Queensland

 

[fontawesome icon=”asterisk” circle=”yes” size=”small” iconcolor=”” circlecolor=”#533B5F” circlebordercolor=”transparent”]Over 30 years of direct clinical experience.

 

 

 

Biography

 

Prof Dooley is one of Brisbane’s most well known and highly regarded private practitioners.  Along with his 30 year involvement and commitment to training at the University of Queensland, he was also one of the people tasked with developing the Clinical Psychology Program at Griffith University.  Roger also was one of the driving forces behind the development of STAP (Supervisor Training and Accreditation Program), and has trained hundred of psychologists in the task of supervision.  Besides these activities, Roger has had a lengthy involvement in both the mental health tribunal, and the ethical review tribunal for health practitioners.

 

Abstract

 

We know empirically that forming a close bond with clients enables effective therapeutic work.  Practitioners must show they care for their clients to earn trust and be taken into confidence: enough so that the client is at ease with you and open to influence. However, sometimes the practitioner and patient get too close, and the treatment alliance gets blurred and then distorted.  This process of losing the right nature of a therapy bond doesn’t come about randomly but through a sequence of decision making moments for which the practitioner is responsible.  Naivety, misguidedness, personal needs and desires, and malevolence can all be motivators for a practitioner slipping down a slope from carer to exploiter.  This talk will explore the ethics which apply to therapeutic boundaries and dual relationships. It will recommend a model of ethical maturity which can guide practitioners in their work. Case examples will be discussed, including what happens if a matter ends up in disciplinary action.   

Venue:   Benchmark Psychology

Address:
2 / 21 Mt Gravatt Capalaba Rd, Upper Mt Gravatt, QLD, 4122, Australia

  • 24 October, 2014
    7:00 pm - 8:30 pm